Talking to the Competition and Markets Authority about Apple

Last week I was part of a meeting with the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority, the regulator, to talk about Apple devices and the browser choice (or lack of it) on them. They’re doing a big study into Apple’s conduct in relation to the distribution of apps on iOS and iPadOS devices in the UK, in particular, the terms and conditions governing app developers’ access to Apple’s App Store, and part of that involves looking at browsers on iOS, and part of that involves talking to people who work on the web. So myself and Bruce Lawson and another UK developer of iOS and web apps put together some thoughts and had a useful long meeting with the CMA on the topic.

They asked that we keep confidential the exact details of what was discussed and asked, which I think is reasonable, but I did put together a slide deck to summarise my thoughts which I presented to them, and you can certainly see that. It’s at kryogenix.org/code/cma-apple and shows everything that I presented to the CMA along with my detailed notes on what it all means.

A slide from the presentation, showing a graph of how far behind Safari is and indicating that all other browsers on iOS are equally far behind, because they're all also Safari

Bruce had a similar slide deck, and you can read his slides on iOS’s browser monopoly and progressive web apps. Bruce has also summarised our other colleague’s presentation, which is what we led off with. The discussion that we then went into was really interesting; they asked some very sensible questions, and showed every sign of properly understanding the problem already and wanting to understand it better. This was good: honestly, I was a bit worried that we might be trying to explain the difference between a browser and a rendering engine to a bunch of retired colonel types who find technology to be baffling and perhaps a little unmanly, and this was emphatically not the case; I found the committee engaging and knowledgeable, and this is encouraging.

In the last few weeks we’ve seen quite a few different governments and regulatory authorities begin to take a stand against tech companies generally and Apple’s control over your devices more specifically. These are baby steps — video and music apps are now permitted to add a link to their own website, saints preserve us, after the Japan Fair Trade Commission’s investigation; developers are now allowed to send emails to their own users which mention payments, which is being hailed as “flexibility” although it doesn’t allow app devs to tell their users about other payment options in the app itself, and there are still court cases and regulatory investigations going on all around the world. Still, the tide may be changing here.

What I would like is that I can give users the best experience on the web, on the best mobile hardware. That best mobile hardware is Apple’s, but at the moment if I want to choose Apple hardware I have to choose a sub-par web experience. Nobody can fix this other than Apple, and there are a bunch of approaches that they could take — they could make Safari be a best-in-class experience for the web, or they could allow other people to collaborate on making the browser best-in-class, or they could stop blocking other browsers from their hardware. People have lots of opinions about which of these, or what else, could and should be done about this; I think pretty much everyone thinks that something should be done about it, though. Even if your goal is to slow the web down and to think that it shouldn’t compete with native apps, there’s no real reason why flexbox and grid and transforms should be worse in Safari, right? Anyway, go and read the talk for more detail on all that. And I’m interested in what you think. Do please hit me up on Twitter about this, or anything else; what do you think should be done, and how?

I'm currently available for hire, to help you plan, architect, and build new systems, and for technical writing and articles. You can take a look at some projects I've worked on and some of my writing. If you'd like to talk about your upcoming project, do get in touch.

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